Transitional Living Program provides stability

Hands overlapping - success

As a child, Thomas* can’t remember ever living with his biological parents. He stayed with his aunts until the age of 16, around the time they began having difficulty “seeing eye to eye on things.”

After moving out, Thomas was assaulted by a person he was staying with, which ultimately landed him in the custody of Child Protective Services. From there, the young man found his way to the Austin Children Shelter Transitional Living Program. He’s been with us since late March, and things are going great.

It’s success stories like Thomas’s that show us how vital the services at ACS are – the difference programs like Transitional Living can make.

It’s success stories like Thomas’s that show us how vital the services at ACS are – the difference programs like Transitional Living can make.

Less than two years ago, Thomas left the care of is aunts and began living with a friend from school. This came to an abrupt end when Thomas and his friend’s mother began to disagree about school and behavior.

CPS took custody of Thomas after the mother assaulted him. He spent a month and a half in the ACS Emergency Cottage, where Thomas was a model resident.

He was polite, conscientious, and composed, which led us to realize that Thomas would be a great fit for our Transitional Living Program.

About seven months ago, Thomas was admitted into TLP, where he has been ever since. He is planning to graduate soon and, after weeks off searching, has successfully obtained employment.

After graduation, he plans to go to trade school or college to learn mechanics. He’s also considering joining the military. Like 77 percent of youth in TLP last year, Thomas is progressing toward academic or vocational goals.

He says he feels stable in the program because he has everything he needs and get as much help as he asks for.

Thomas hasn’t considered how long he plans to stay in TLP, but he says the program brings him comfort and support.

 

*To protect his identity, we’re referring to the 17-year-old by an alternate name.

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